The Religious Freedom Loophole

The first part of the First Amendment states that all Americans have the freedom of religion. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof …”
So what does that mean, exactly? According to the law, no one religion is supposed reign supreme – nor can anyone be prohibited from exercising their beliefs. But that phrase “free exercise” is a broad one. What happens when religious groups take advantage of these special freedoms to make money, skirt rules or hurt children? This hour of Reveal explores the tricky territory of religious freedom and how different groups have exploited this loophole.
Illustration by Anna Vignet

Reveal | 27th February 2016

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The Black and White Fallacy

the-black-and-whiteWhy do you try to drain the world of color when backed into a rhetorical corner? Why do you have such a hard time realizing that you have suggested the world is devoid of nuance when you are in the heat of an argument, reducing all every wavelength to black and white, and all choices to A or B?
In this episode, you’ll learn from three experts in logic and arguing why human brains are prone to the black and white fallacy and the false dichotomies it generates. You’ll learn how to spot this fallacy, what to do when someone uses it against you, and how to avoid committing it yourself.

You Are Not So Smart | 19th February 2016

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Each Age Gets the Bloodshed It Needs: 20,000 Years of Violence

20,000 years ago, the average person stood a 10-20% chance of dying violently. Today, the chance is under 1%. We have cut rates of violent death by 90% by creating large organisations that impose peace; but the main method for creating these organisations has been war. In effect, violence has slowly been putting itself out of business. The broad trends suggest that this process will probably continue. A talk by Prof. Ian Morris, Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2015-16.

LSE Ideas | 9th February 2016

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