Oliver Sipple

One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple’s split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?

Radiolab

 

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

From Pussy Riot to Penal Colony

Pussy Riot gained worldwide recognition in 2012 when three of their members, including Maria Alyokhina, were arrested in Moscow for performing a protest song at a cathedral near the Kremlin. Maria, and one other member, were sentenced to live nearly two years in a penal colony in Siberia for “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred” charges. Today, Maria tells us about her experience in prison, the protests and how she took her prison guards to court and won.

Outlook – BBC Worldwide Service

 

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

The Rise of the New German Right

In just a few days, Germans will go to the polls to vote for a new government. For decades, Germany’s elections have been subdued and predictable, but this campaign cycle has seen a rise of fake news, hate groups and right-wing politicians with a nationalist agenda. There also are allegations of Russian meddling. In this episode we look at the rise of right-wing populism in Germany’s election.

Reveal

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Venezuela on the Brink of Collapse?

How has the oil rich Venezuela managed to fail as a state? Inflation is running at more than 700 per cent, food is scarce and more than 90 people have been killed by the security forces. David Aaronovitch questions the role former president Hugo Chavez and president Maduro played in compounding the crisis and investigates what might lie ahead.
Expertise provided by Dany Bahar from The Brookings Institution, Andrea Murta from Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center of the Atlantic Council and Miguel Tinker-Salas from Pomona College, California.

The Briefing Room

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Utopias in History and an Environmental Disaster

Ideas of universal basic income, 15 hour workweek and opening of all boarders apparently have a remarkable history. Writer and thinker Rutger Bregman in his new book Utopia for Realists reasons that the time has come to propose them again. He is our guest in this episode. Meanwhile, BBC radio producer Julian May talks about the aftermath of the Torrey Canyon disaster, when a huge oil tanker ran aground in 1967.

History extra

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Malcolm Gladwell Argues for Mediocrity

Malcolm Gladwell in a conversation on running fast, satire as a weapon, Daniel Ellsberg and Edward Snowden, Harvard’s under-theorized endowment, why early childhood intervention is overrated, long-distance running, and Malcolm’s happy risk-averse career going from one “fur-lined rat hole to the next.”

Conversations with Tyler

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

This is Not a Safe Space

Resistance to political correctness at the University of Chicago. Last September it’s incoming freshmen received a letter from the administration that said, “We do not support so-called ‘trigger warnings.’ The university’s position, the letter insisted, was based on the administration’s “commitment to academic freedom” and their dedication to “fostering the free exchange of ideas” and “diversity of opinion and background.”

Earlier this month libertarian political scientist Charles Murray, derided by many as a racist take on the relationship between genetics and intelligence, was invited to speak at Middlebury College in Vermont. Murray only made it a couple of words into his talk when more than half of those crowding the hall stood up, turned their backs on him and proceeded to read a long prepared remark, en masse. When Murray and the liberal professor who was to interview him after his talk were walking to the car, the crowds jostled him, and injured her.

Little Atoms

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

The Limits of Freedom

Is too much freedom paradoxically debilitating? Neuroscience shows and history suggests, we are less content when we have more choice. Do we need constraints to thrive, and might our chains be key to our freedom? Or is this a dangerous conceit of the privileged and free? Psychiatrist Theodore Dalrymple, Blair’s former Senior Policy Advisor Julian Le Grand, and author of “I Find That Offensive!” Claire Fox interrogate choice.

Philosophy for Our Times

Play
Good to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook